Reasons to see your Podiatrist

October 05, 2017 - 9:00am

Reasons to see your Podiatrist

Your foot hurts. What do you do next? Do you know why it hurts and what is causing the pain? Can you see what is hurting it? If you can, do you know what it is and why it hurts? What do you do about it? Do you visit your local pharmacy / GP?

How about going to see a Podiatrist?
Podiatrists are foot specialists. Physiofusion’s Podiatrists specialise in all problems regarding lower limbs. They also know:

What’s inside your foot
How it should be working
Why it may not be working properly or causing pain

Other factors that may affect your foot/feet:
- Heart and circulation
- Lungs and breathing
- Diabetes
- Nerves and neurological issues
- Arthritis – Osteo and Inflammatory
- Musculoskeletal issues
- Medication

You may have heard the word Podiatry or Chiropody, but what are they and are they the same thing? It can seem confusing, can’t it?

Chiropody was the original qualification in the UK and a diploma, too. It generally covered treatment for nails, corns, callus, and verrucae.

The term Podiatry was introduced when the qualification became a degree. Podiatry includes all of the traditional “Chiropody” treatments and more. Podiatrists are trained to assess, diagnose and treat problems with the lower limbs.

Thick, ingrowing, fungal & damaged nails.

Corns and callus (hard skin).

Rashes or infections of the skin.

Verrucae.

Pain in your feet, ankles, knees, hips or lower back.

We’re also here to help if you simply struggle to get down to your feet.

Diabetes and feet – what’s it all about?

Do you have diabetes and have heard that you must look after your feet. You may be thinking, why?
Uncontrolled blood sugars can cause damage to circulation and nerves in the feet because they are furthest away from the heart and brain.

Damage to nerves may mean you can’t feel (or don’t feel enough) pain, heat/cold, touch, pressure – this is reduced sensation.

Feeling pain is a warning of something that may cause harm.

If you have reduced sensation, you may not be able to tell that something is causing a wound.

If you have a wound, you need good circulation to enable it to heal.

Oxygenated blood brings nutrients to a wound and takes the waste away.

If you have impaired sensation, you may not have the warning that something is harming you/causing a wound.

If you have a wound, your circulation may not work as well as it should to heal it.

Is there anything you can do to manage it and reduce having problems with my feet?
...Of course!

Control your blood sugars as much as you can.

Don’t walk around barefoot.

Have showers, not baths (you may not be able to tell how hot it is and damage your feet by putting them in first).

Even if you think your feet are cold, do not put them next to a heater, radiator or fire.

Check you have nothing in shoes that could damage your feet.

Check your feet daily and see a Podiatrist, (or nurse/GP) the same day if you have a wound or if you notice anything that looks different with your skin or the structure of your feet.

Dry your feet thoroughly but gently after washing.

Moisturise your feet daily (not in between your toes).

See a Podiatrist regularly!
- Thick nails can lead to ulcers under the nail.
- Heavy corns and callus can breakdown and ulcerate.
- Changes in circulation and sensation can be monitored.
- Wounds/ulcers can be treated and pressure reduced (offloaded).
- High pressure areas (at risk of ulceration) can be offloaded.

If you have any issues or queries regarding your feet and lower limbs, please get in touch with Physiofusion. They have seen it and treated it all before and they will be able to help you with any questions you have. Contact them on 01282 453 110 or alternatively, send them a message via their FREE Ask-A-Physio service online.

P – Pain
O - Optimum foot health
D - Diabetes
I - Infection – fungal, viral or bacterial
A – assessment/advice
T - Toenail ingrowing
R – Reduced mobility
I – Ill health
S – Sensation or vascular health reduced
T – Tailored treatment plan